Photography by Martin Chalk
[separator]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[shim]
[logo]
Home Events News Gallery Podcasts Sitemap
Site Search [shim]

NPAACT Home > News Items > NSW GOVERNMENT URGED TO KILL OFF HUNTING BILL

NSW GOVERNMENT URGED TO KILL OFF HUNTING BILL

26-August-2009

Published: August 26, 2009, 9:15 am
Section: Jon Stanhope, MLA | Media Releases

Chief Minister and Minister for Territory and Municipal Services Jon Stanhope has urged the NSW Government to reject a Billcurrently before parliament, which would allow hunting in national parks and the creation of private game reserves, with significant consequences for pest management and public safety in the ACT.

Mr Stanhope has written formally to the NSW Minister for Primary Industries, the Hon Ian Macdonald MLC and the Minister for Climate Change and the Environment, the Hon Carmel Tebbutt MP, to express his concerns about the Shooters' Party Game and Feral Animal Control Amendment Bill 2009.

He said the Bill could threaten the safety of bushwalkers and interfere with the ACT's pest management programs.

"If passed, this Bill could allow hunting in national parks located near the ACT, such as the Kosciuszko National Park or Brindabella National Park, which would threaten the safety of bushwalkers and potentially disrupt the ACT's ongoing pest management programs," Mr Stanhope said.

"This Bill also provides for the release of a number of bird species into NSW private game reserves, some of which have been assessed as a serious threat to the environment.

"These species could migrate into the safe haven of Namadgi National Park and other reserves in the ACT, threatening native flora and fauna and adding significantly to the expense and effort already directed at pest control in the ACT."

Pest species recognised by the National Vertebrate Pests Committee as an extreme threat, which could be released under the Bill, include the bobwhite quail and Californian quail.

Other listed game birds that could be released into private game reserves, and which are declared or recognised in the ACT for their pest potential, include the red-whiskered bulbul, spotted dove, Indian myna and starling.

Mr Stanhope also said there was no credible justification to the claim that hunting in conservation reserves was an effective means of controlling pest species.

"I urge the NSW Government to give full consideration to the implications of this Bill to the ACT."

Media Contact:

Jess Wurf 6205 0504 0411 772 700 jess.wurf@act.gov.au

 

[shim]
[shim]
[shim] [arrow] Copyright   [arrow] Privacy   [arrow] Disclaimer   [arrow] Contact Us   [arrow] Webmaster [shim] Last updated 19 August 2017